Elizabeth II’s Jewels
The Queen Mother’s Ruby and Diamond Floral Clips
There are not one but two of these ruby and diamond floral clips in existence, and the pair are mirror images of each other. They each include two ruby and diamond flowers (one with a ruby center, one with a diamond center stone) with two diamond leaves and diamond stems, and were made by Cartier.
These were a part of the Queen Mother’s collection, and are usually said to have been part of the bequest left to her by Mrs. Ronald Greville in 1942. She did occasionally use both clips together, but we usually see just one at a time. Incorporated into the Queen’s collection since her mother’s death in 2002, they are now used sparingly.

Elizabeth II’s Jewels

The Queen Mother’s Ruby and Diamond Floral Clips

There are not one but two of these ruby and diamond floral clips in existence, and the pair are mirror images of each other. They each include two ruby and diamond flowers (one with a ruby center, one with a diamond center stone) with two diamond leaves and diamond stems, and were made by Cartier.

These were a part of the Queen Mother’s collection, and are usually said to have been part of the bequest left to her by Mrs. Ronald Greville in 1942. She did occasionally use both clips together, but we usually see just one at a time. Incorporated into the Queen’s collection since her mother’s death in 2002, they are now used sparingly.

Elizabeth II’s Jewels

The Nizam of Hyderabad Rose Brooches and Necklace

There is one large brooch and two identical smaller brooches. The Queen almost always wears the smaller two as a pair and the larger one by itself; the larger brooch is more frequently worn, though it is not among her most used pieces.

The Nizam of Hyderabad necklace still remains. As it was a stock piece from the jeweler, it had existed for some years and had been sold and repurchased previously. At one point in time the central pendant was longer (containing three parts) and there were two additional pendants (each including two parts) on either side. The necklace had been simplified to its current form by the time it became one of the royal wedding gifts.

As with many of her necklaces, the Queen did eventually shorten the chain to suit her tastes, and she still wears it from time to time today. It has been loaned to the Duchess of Cambridge, who wore the necklace for the first time in February 2014.

Elizabeth II’s Jewels
The Four Row Japanese Pearl Choker
Though the Queen has a habit of shortening longer necklaces to suit her, she usually stays away from the choker style, making this particular piece an interesting part of her collection. The necklace includes four rows of pearls with a central diamond clasp in a curved shape, each side including three rows of diamonds that join at the top and bottom with marquise diamonds. According to Garrard: The Crown Jewellers for 150 Years, the Queen commissioned this from a set of the “finest cultured pearls presented to her by the Japanese government.” She made her first state visit to Japan in 1975; the choker was in use by at least 1982.

Elizabeth II’s Jewels

The Four Row Japanese Pearl Choker

Though the Queen has a habit of shortening longer necklaces to suit her, she usually stays away from the choker style, making this particular piece an interesting part of her collection. The necklace includes four rows of pearls with a central diamond clasp in a curved shape, each side including three rows of diamonds that join at the top and bottom with marquise diamonds. According to Garrard: The Crown Jewellers for 150 Years, the Queen commissioned this from a set of the “finest cultured pearls presented to her by the Japanese government.” She made her first state visit to Japan in 1975; the choker was in use by at least 1982.

Elizabeth II’s Jewels
The Richmond Brooch
A present from the town of Richmond for her 1893 wedding to the future King George V, Queen Mary’s Richmond Brooch is a large piece made from diamonds set in silver and gold in a scrolling design surrounding a central pearl, with a pearl and diamond pendant hanging below. It’s a flexible jewel - the central pearl and pearl pendant are detachable , more pendants can be added, the whole brooch can be used as a pendant itself, and Queen Mary even used it in her hair.

Elizabeth II’s Jewels

The Richmond Brooch

A present from the town of Richmond for her 1893 wedding to the future King George V, Queen Mary’s Richmond Brooch is a large piece made from diamonds set in silver and gold in a scrolling design surrounding a central pearl, with a pearl and diamond pendant hanging below. It’s a flexible jewel - the central pearl and pearl pendant are detachable , more pendants can be added, the whole brooch can be used as a pendant itself, and Queen Mary even used it in her hair.

Elizabeth II’s Jewels
The Women of Hampshire Brooch
This diamond and pearl brooch, which was originally intended to be used as a pendant, was Queen Mary’s wedding gift from the Women of Hampshire in 1893. A committee chaired by the Duchess of Wellington raised £775 and selected this pendant from Garrard. The piece features a large brilliant with a foliate spray above and three bell flower pendants below - thanks to those flowers, this is often referred to as the Harebell Brooch. Two pear-shaped diamonds and one baroque pearl hang from the flowers; they are all removable.

Elizabeth II’s Jewels

The Women of Hampshire Brooch

This diamond and pearl brooch, which was originally intended to be used as a pendant, was Queen Mary’s wedding gift from the Women of Hampshire in 1893. A committee chaired by the Duchess of Wellington raised £775 and selected this pendant from Garrard. The piece features a large brilliant with a foliate spray above and three bell flower pendants below - thanks to those flowers, this is often referred to as the Harebell Brooch. Two pear-shaped diamonds and one baroque pearl hang from the flowers; they are all removable.